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Subject Topic: Rehydrating a dry cigar? Post Reply Post New Topic
Message posted by RoyalCoronas on March-10-2010 at 02:17 - IP Logged
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Has anyone here done it with any success? I received some from someone who kept them in a not so humid environment, but otherwise they are okay.

I thought about cutting up some apples and placing them in a container together in the refrigerator.

Or how about hydration disks? I have seen those, do they work?

Message posted by slowburn on March-10-2010 at 02:24 - IP Logged
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I've brought a few back to life, but they always just don't seem right. I just put them in the humi and let them slooowly come back.

Message posted by RoyalCoronas on March-10-2010 at 16:45 - IP Logged
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Ahh, I was hoping for something a little quicker.

Well, I guess I should know first how long it usually takes for them to come back, so how long?

Message posted by guzman on March-10-2010 at 20:11 - IP Logged
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Unfortunately when the cigars dry up the tobacco loses a lot of the essential oils too. When you rehidrate them, you bring the water moisture back, but the evaporated oils are gone forever. That is why they never really taste like they should.

If you rehidrate them too fast, they will likely break - so al slowburn says, do it very slowly. As the cigars dry up they also shrink a little bit and the leaves become papery, startin with the wrapper which is the finest of all layers. The wrapper needs to return to its elasticity before the binder and filler plump up again - or it'll crack.

Good luck!

Guz


Message posted by RoyalCoronas on March-11-2010 at 04:53 - IP Logged
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That saddens me that smoking these won't be as good as can be because of the lost of natural oils; I didn't know that.

Oh well, I guess I will have to buy a new pack too in order to compare.

Message posted by puffer on March-19-2010 at 13:59 - IP Logged
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If the outer layer of the cigar is already dry and papery, is it possible that we can wrap it with another fresh tobacco leaf to regain the taste of the cigar? Are there any oils that we can pour onto the dried tobacco to make it like new again?

Message posted by Dave K on March-19-2010 at 18:03 - IP Logged
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Quote: Originally posted by puffer on 19-March-2010
If the outer layer of the cigar is already dry and papery, is it possible that we can wrap it with another fresh tobacco leaf to regain the taste of the cigar? Are there any oils that we can pour onto the dried tobacco to make it like new again?


Hypothetically re-wrapping the cigar might add some freshness, but it is something I would never do.  Much of the flavor of the cigar comes from the wrapper so unless you have access to the factory and the leaves they use, you will substantially change the flavor of the cigar.

Your best bet is proper storage.  Once it's dried out, it can never be brought back to its original glory. 



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Dave

Message posted by tejanoloco on March-20-2010 at 03:31 - IP Logged
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What about the salt test. Well, not exactly a test, but putting them in a plastic bag with a bottle cap with salt and water.  Would that work?



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Tejanoloco


UP THE IRONS!!!!!!

Message posted by Dave K on March-20-2010 at 08:02 - IP Logged
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Quote: Originally posted by tejanoloco on 20-March-2010

What about the salt test. Well, not exactly a test, but putting them in a plastic bag with a bottle cap with salt and water.  Would that work?


nope, you'll just get salty cigars. 


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Dave

Message posted by RoyalCoronas on March-20-2010 at 20:25 - IP Logged
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This is so funny, everyone is trying to come up with ways to revive dried cigars.

I have never heard of the salt test, that sounds like meat brine.

Message posted by 90milestoCuba on March-21-2010 at 00:08 - IP Logged
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There is no way to fully "revive" a cigar back to its former glory.  There is also no quick or easy way, (there are but you will likely damage the cigar).  With that being said dried-out cigars require special precautions.  When a dried out cigar is placed in an environment higher that what it is currently at, the wrapper will rapidy swell, often causing the wrapper to split or to part from the cigar body.  The open end of the cigar may also sell or "bloom", causing the wrapper to split.  Either condition may ruin the cigar for smoking.  The only way to prevent this is to revive them slowly with an electronic humidifier.  If you decide to revive your dried out stogies here are some steps to follow:

Seal two or three of your "dead" cigars along with an accurate hygrometer in a zip-lock bag and let it sit for 24 hours.  Read the hygrometer after 24 hours and record the RH, this is the RH of the cigars and the RH at which they are "comfortable" and is your baseline RH for where to start.

Put the cigars in a container that is of the same RH as the cigar, tupperware or an empty humidor is fine.  Before putting the sticks into the container check the RH with a hygrometer for a few hours before proceeding.  Note if you are using a wooden humidor you will need to let it air out till it reaches the baseline RH. 

When the humidor or container is close to the baseline of the dead sticks put the sticks into the humi or container and adjust your electronic humidifer 5% above the base line RH.  Leave the cigars at this humidity level for about a week.  Continue to raise the humidity by 5% per week until you reach 70%. 

There are other ways but this is the only way I know to get the most out of dead sticks.  I hope this helps!



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--Winston Churchill

Message posted by Dave K on March-21-2010 at 19:54 - IP Logged
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Quote: Originally posted by RoyalCoronas on 20-March-2010
I have never heard of the salt test, that sounds like meat brine.
The salt test is used to calibrate your hygrometer.  It creates an exact environment of 75%RH.  I would never use it on my cigars though.


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Dave

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The salt method is quite funny but it created my curiosity of what the taste would be like when we add salt into the cigar.

What is RH? Sorry for being so new about this humidor because I haven't used one yet.

Message posted by Dave K on March-22-2010 at 20:44 - IP Logged
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RH is Relative Humidity.  Typically you want to keep it around 70%.  Personally I prefer 65% for my Cuban Cigars as I find they smoke a bit better at that RH.  Anything much over 70% and you run a higher risk of mold destroying your cigar.

FWIW, Many cigars are actually a bit salty in flavor without adding any extra.  Personally it isn't a flavor I enjoy, but it isn't too bad if others are there to offset it.



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Dave

Message posted by RoyalCoronas on March-28-2010 at 18:23 - IP Logged
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So exactly how do you do the salt test to calibrate your hygrometer? Do you have to use cigars that aren't useful anymore?

Message posted by 90milestoCuba on March-28-2010 at 21:01 - IP Logged
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I can answer the hygro calibration, rehydrating the sticks with salt that is a totally different process that I have no knowlege about. 

Use a one to one ratio of table salt and water, this will give you an RH of 75%.  The salt & water mixture should be pasty like wet sand not runny.  I usually use about 1/8 of a cup of salt & water in a small bowl. If any water is on the surface after mixing, pour it off.  Place the bowl in a ziplock bag with your hygrometer. 

Analog Units: If it is an analog unit, let it sit 12 hours in the ziplock bag with salt before calibrating, it should read 75%.  Using the adjustment screw on the back (location may vary read the instructions that came with the unit) adjust the hygrometer until it reads 75%.  Optional steps: After inital 12 hours, place back in the bag with the salt & water, let sit and additional 12 hours.  If the hygrometer does not read 75% adjust again and place bag in bag for 12 hours.  Take the reading and if it varies from 75% this will be your standard deviation.  You can continue to calibrate if you want but to me it is a waste of time.  Note the standard deviation from 75% and use this for future reference.  For example: if your hygro is reading 78% when you know the RH is 75% your standard deviation is +3%.  So when it is in your humidor and you want to keep the RH at 70% you would look for a reading on the hygro of 70% + 3% = 73%.

Digital units: Most are not adjustable so you would note your standard deviation from above.  My digital unit has a standard deviation of +3% so I know to adjust accordingly. I am keeping my cigars at 70% so when I check it, the hygro should read 70% + 3% = 73%

Use cigars that you are trying to revive.  The point is to find their RH as a starting point for reviving them.  Using cigars other than what you will be reviving doesn't give you an accurate comfortable RH for the sticks.  Hope that helps answer your question! 

 



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Message posted by SamS on March-29-2010 at 13:37 - IP Logged
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Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, but I'm new to this, only how do you stop them drying out in the first place? Are cigar boxes a good place to keep cigars at all?

Message posted by 90milestoCuba on March-29-2010 at 16:49 - IP Logged
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You can keep them in the box if you put in a humidor.  Just keeping them in the box they will eventually dry out.  Cheapest way is to buy a plastic container large enough for your stogies, (I prefer to keep in the box if put in a plastic container) and put a humitube or humidification crystals in the container and keep at or below 70 degrees F. One step up would be to buy a humidor and use the crystals.  The optimum method for care of your precious commodity is a well constructed humidor with an electronic humidification system such as a Cigar Oasis.  Habanos recommends you keep them at 70 degrees Farenheit and 70% relative humidity.  The humidification crystals and solution are available at most tobacco shops. 



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If you have knowledge, let others light their candles with it.
--Winston Churchill

Message posted by papaj on April-09-2010 at 02:54 - IP Logged
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Wow, there is a wealth of knowledge here. I have managed to nurse a few dry cigars here as of late, but like some of you said here, the flavor paled in comparison to ones that never dehydrated.

Message posted by 90milestoCuba on April-12-2010 at 21:00 - IP Logged
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Quote: Originally posted by papaj on 09-April-2010
Wow, there is a wealth of knowledge here. I have managed to nurse a few dry cigars here as of late, but like some of you said here, the flavor paled in comparison to ones that never dehydrated.
Yeah my wife has accused of knowing everything about nothing from time to time.  Oh well!  Ignorance is bliss sometimes! 


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If you have knowledge, let others light their candles with it.
--Winston Churchill

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